Fragmented personas

I’m continuously hearing about how the “youth” of the world, the “internet youth”, are posting everything about themselves for everyone to see. More often I’m seeing adults who, thinking they’re following in line with the future, are posting up everything they’re doing and then inviting their professional and social contacts to view it. The difference here is enormous. A 16 year old talking about what show sucks on TV or what teacher they hate is one thing. The same thing coming from a 32 year old marketer is another. I’ve had freelancers tweet about their current projects when that current project was with me and was supposed to be dark (what they thought the NDA was for is beyond me).

We have to edit ourselves. We can’t tell everyone everything about ourselves.

We speak of the “future” as a place where everyone will tell each other everything. We sell this idea to our clients. But we know it’s not possible. We’re just lying to ourselves about what “everything” means. For teens “everything” is really everything. I’m sure, really really sure, you don’t want to see me sexting.  That’s the extreme but there’s other, shallower, levels of editing we do everyday. Did you have a bad day at work last week and think about how much of a douche your lazy boss is? You probably can’t tweet that. Your boss is probably following you. We’re so used to posting the things we love and getting gratification for them that doesn’t part of each of us want to post the things we hate?

So what’s the solution? Are things like this: http://mashable.com/2009/06/01/twitter-related-burglary/ going to happen a whole lot more?

last thought. Kids are kids, by the time it’s the future they’ll have grown into adults.